Too Little Sleep Takes Toll on Kids’ Mental Health: Study

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FRIDAY, March 27, 2020 — Kids who don’t get enough sleep may be at risk for ADHD, anxiety, depression and other mental health problems, researchers report. ” If we make sure our children get enough sleep, it can help protect them from mental health…

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Abstract
CONTEXT: In the absence of baseline testing, normative data may be used to interpret postconcussion scores on the clinical reaction-time test (RTclin). However, to provide normative data, we must understand the performance factors associated with baseline testing.
OBJECTIVE: To explore performance factors associated with baseline RTclin from among candidate variables representing demographics, medical and concussion history, self-reported symptoms, sleep, and sport-related features.
DESIGN: Cross-sectional study.
SETTING: Clinical setting (eg, athletic training room).
PATIENTS OR OTHER…

Source: J Athl TrainCategory: Sports Medicine Authors: Tags: J Athl Train Source Type: research

Abstract
All large population-based administrative studies currently indicate a significant comorbidity of adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) with addictive, anxiety and in particular affective disorders. In these investigations the risk for one of these comorbid disorders increased with increasing age of the ADHD patients. The most recent genome-wide association and correlation studies also revealed indications for joint genetic risk factors of ADHD with, in particular unipolar depression, bipolar disorder, autism spectrum disorders, Tourette’s syndrome and to a lesser extent schizophrenia…

Source: Der NervenarztCategory: Neurology Authors: Tags: Nervenarzt Source Type: research

(Norwegian University of Science and Technology) A study of almost 800 children followed over several years shows that those who get the fewest hours of sleep are at greatest risk of developing psychiatric difficulties later, including ADHD, anxiety and depression.

Abstract:
The American Medical Society for Sports Medicine convened a panel of experts to provide an evidence-based, best practice document to assist sports medicine physicians and other members of the athletic care network with the detection, treatment, and prevention of mental health (MH) issues in competitive athletes. This statement discusses how members of the sports medicine team, including team physicians, athletic trainers, and MH providers, work together in providing comprehensive psychological care to athletes. It specifically addresses psychological factors in athletes including personality issues and the psyc…

Abstract:
The American Medical Society for Sports Medicine convened a panel of experts to provide an evidence-based, best practices document to assist sports medicine physicians and other members of the athletic care network with the detection, treatment, and prevention of mental health issues in competitive athletes. This statement discusses how members of the sports medicine team, including team physicians, athletic trainers, and mental health providers, work together in providing comprehensive psychological care to athletes. It specifically addresses psychological factors in athletes including personality issues and t…

This article discusses how nature, gardening, and bringing the outdoors in can instill in us a tranquil mindset and improve our mental health.

Nature and Wellbeing

Nature and wellbeing have been thought to be associated throughout history. A 2016 study published by the University of Derby has confirmed the significance of this association from a scientific point of view. Working with the Wildlife Trusts, the researchers found that participants who engaged with nature each day for 30 days reported sustained increases in health and happiness. 

The paper suggested that we feel happier after prolonged exposure to…

Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self ImprovementCategory: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: featured health and fitness meditation psychology self improvement gardening mental health pickthebrain Source Type: blogs

Atopic dermatitis (AD) impacts up to 20% of children worldwide (1;2). Children with AD experience physical discomfort, poorer quality of life (3-5), increased behavior problems (6;7), higher frequency of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (8-11) and higher healthcare utilization (12). Parents of children with AD report decreased quality of life (13-16), negative impact on the family (14;17), increased depression and anxiety (16), and increased work absenteeism (18;19).

Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and ImmunologyCategory: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research

This study is a single-center, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, and investigator-initiated clinical trial. A total of 60 patients between 7 and 65 years of age with AD and respiratory disorders who received a diagnosis of AD by Hanifin and Rajka criteria who scored 15 to 50 in a scoring atopic dermatitis (SCORAD) will be enrolled. Participants will be randomly assigned to the SCRT or placebo group in a ratio of 1:1 and they will have a visit schedule comprising 4 visits including a screening visit during 8 to 10 weeks. The participants will be administered SCRT or placebo 3 times a day for 4 weeks. The primary…

Source: MedicineCategory: Internal Medicine Tags: Research Article: Study Protocol Clinical Trial Source Type: research

Abstract
Sleep problems are common in school-age children and linked to numerous negative outcomes. Sleep disturbances are particularly common in children with mental health disorders, such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, depression, and anxiety. Despite frequent use of nonpharmacological pediatric sleep interventions to treat common sleep problems, there is a paucity of research on whether these interventions are effective. Further, it is unclear whether by targeting sleep, these interventions lead to broader improvements in the domains of functioning that are commonly affected by poor sleep. The pre…

Source: Behavior TherapyCategory: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Behav Ther Source Type: research

AbstractSocial networking sites (SNSs) are now used by billions of users worldwide and can help facilitate communication and the sharing of information. However, there is evidence that problematic SNS use (PSNSU) can have negative effects on health. The present study examined the associations between PSNSU, sleep quality, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), depression, anxiety and stress among SNS users. A total of 638 SNS users (mean age  = 32.03 years, SD = 10.08) completed an online survey comprising instruments assessing SNS addiction, sleep quality, ADHD, depression, anxie…

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